English ditransitive verbs
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English ditransitive verbs aspects of theory, description and a usage-based model by Joybrato Mukherjee

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Published by Rodopi in Amsterdam .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJoybrato Mukherjee.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPE
The Physical Object
Pagination295 p. :
Number of Pages295
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22622448M
ISBN 109042019344

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The present book offers fresh insights into the description of ditransitive verbs and their complementation in present-day English. In the theory-oriented first part, a pluralist framework is developed on the basis of previous research that integrates ditransitive verbs as lexical items with both the entirety of their complementation patterns and the cognitive and semantic aspects of Cited by: "English Ditransitive Verbs" published on 01 Jan by Brill | by: What does ditransitive mean? ditransitive is defined by the lexicographers at Oxford Dictionaries as Denoting a verb that takes two objects, for example give as in I gave her the book. Some Ditransitive Verbs in English All of the verbs below can be used in a ditransitive way, though they can all be used with just one object, and sometimes none.

Definition of Ditransitive Verbs from our glossary of English linguistic and grammatical terms containing explanations and cross-references to other relevant English grammar terms. Ditransitive Verbs @ The Internet Grammar of English. Definition: A ditransitive verb is one that takes two complements, a direct object and an indirect object at the same time. Examples. He gave her the letter. * "The letter" is the direct object, what he gave, and "her" is the indirect object, the person he gave it to. The present book offers fresh insights into the description of ditransitive verbs and their complementation in present-day English. In the theory-oriented first part, a pluralist framework is developed on the basis of previous research that integrates ditransitive verbs as lexical items with both the entirety of their complementation patterns and the cognitive and semantic aspects of.

  Hi everyone! I'm frequently in doubt about the constructions with ditransitive verbs. For instance: I can say "Give it to me", "Give me the book", "Give the book to the teacher". - I can say "He asked the teacher that question". - But it seems that it's wrong to say "He asket that question to the teacher" and "give me it". So, I can "give someone something" and "give something to someone. Decomposing Ditransitive Verbs Sentence (24a) bears the meaning of (24b), but not the meaning of (24c). Importantly, in such cases, the causee is never marked by the accusative. Ditransitive verb (V + N + N + N): John gave Mary a book. However, identifying discrete categories of verbs based on transitivity is not always easy, because (in English, anyway) there exist a Author: Quora Contributor. VERB + INDIRECT OBJECT + DIRECT OBJECT; A ditransitive verb accepts or may require an indirect object to complete its meaning—"the noun to whom something is given" or simply "the recipient". The indirect object takes form as a noun phrase —a name (Jane), an accusative pronoun (him, her, them, us, me), or a noun (the young woman).In Latin, it is known as the dative case.